Buying or selling property is one of the biggest and most important financial decisions you will make.

It can be an exciting time, however, it can also be complex and involve a pile of paperwork.

What is Conveyancing?
Conveyancing is the process of transferring the ownership of property from one person to another. Conveyancers are usually engaged after the contract has been signed with a Real Estate Agent.

It is recommended to engage the services of a Conveyancer during the process of signing a contract to ensure all your legal obligations are met and to protect your rights and interests.

Conveyancers are licenced professionals that can provide information and advice about the sale and purchase of property.

Conveyancers prepare legal documents, conduct research about the property and represent you in preparing for and during settlement. They also calculate the adjustment of rates and taxes, liaise with the other party’s representative and financial institution and maintain contact with you to guide you through the process.

Conveyancers are required to attend to the verification of identity and authority of each client to adhere to the policies put out by the Registrar General of Land Services.

Is it compulsory to use a Conveyancer?
It is not compulsory to engage a Conveyancer to guide you through a transaction, but Conveyancing work is highly technical and specialised. If you opt to do-it-yourself it can certainly be a minefield.

Some, but not all, Conveyancers are Certified Practising Conveyancers (CPC). This helps identify Conveyancers who have met certain criteria set by the Australian Institute of Conveyancers SA Division, and is a sign of excellence and professionalism within their industry.

You can feel confident that your Conveyancer is making every effort to keep up-to-date with the ever changing legal requirements and improving their skills by attending professional development on an ongoing basis. The Strathalbyn Conveyancing team are Certified Practicing Conveyancers.

So, why do I need a Conveyancer?
Basically to protect your interests and to guide you through the complex property transfer process.